For the Good of Illinois

OpenTheBooks Oversight Report - The Militarization Of America

July 5, 2016 09:03 AM

THE MILITARIZATION OF AMERICA
OpenTheBooks Oversight Report
 
 2016-06-16_15-08-26
 
OpenTheBooks Oversight Report – The Militarization of America: 
Non-Military Federal Agencies Purchases of Guns, Ammunition, and Military-Style Equipment 
Fiscal Years 2006 – 2014
 
See the line-by-line transactions (raw data) for the Administrative Federal Agencies purchase of guns, ammunition and military-style equipment, click here.
 
See the line-by-line transactions (raw data) for the Traditional Law Enforcement Agencies purchase of guns, ammunition and military-style equipment, click here.
 
 
 2016-06-16_15-14-39
The Militarization of America
By Dr. Tom Coburn and Adam Andrzejewski | June 17, 2016
 
 
We quantified $1.4 billion in non-military federal agencies purchase of guns, ammunition and military-style equipment during the last nine years. 
 
We estimate that federal non-military agencies now employ more officers with arrest and firearm authorization than there are U.S. Marines.  There are 182,000 U.S. Marines and over 200,000 plus officers employed within the rank-and-file federal agencies.
 
2016-06-16_22-15-01
 
Please download a PDF copy:  OpenTheBooks Oversight Report – The Militarization of America
 
Special Agents at the IRS equipped with AR15 military rifles?  
 
Health and Human Services ‘Special Office of Inspector General Agents’ being trained by Army’s Special Forces contractors? 
 
The Department of Veterans Affairs arming 3,700 employees?
 
KEY FINDINGS (FY2006-FY2014) – THE MILITARIZATION OF AMERICA
 
  1. Sixty-seven non-military federal agencies spent $1.48 billion on guns, ammunition, and military-style equipment.
  2. Of that total amount, ‘Traditional Law Enforcement’ Agencies spent 77 percent ($1.14 billion) while ‘Administrative’ or ‘General’ Agencies spent 23 percent ($335.1 million).
  3. Non-military federal spending on guns and ammunition jumped 104 percent from $55 million (FY2006) to $112 million (FY2011).
  4. Nearly 6 percent ($42 million) of all federal guns and ammunition purchase transactions were wrongly coded. Some purchases were actually for ping-pong balls, gym equipment, bread, copiers, cotton balls, or cable television including a line item from the Coast Guard entered as "Cable Dude".
  5. Administrative agencies including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Small Business Administration (SBA), Smithsonian Institution, Social Security Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, United States Mint, Department of Education, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and many other agencies purchased guns, ammo, and military-style equipment.
  6. Since 2004, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) purchased 1.7 billion bullets including 453 million hollow-point bullets. As of 1/1/2014, DHS estimated its bullet inventory-reserve at 22-months, or 160 million rounds.
  7. Between 1998 and 2008 (the most recent comprehensive data available) the number of law enforcement officers employed by federal agencies increased nearly 50 percent from 83,000 (1998) to 120,000 (2008). However, Department of Justice officer count increased from 40,000 (2008) to 69,000 (2013) and Department of Homeland Security officer count increased from 55,000 (2008) to 70,000 (2013).
  8. The Internal Revenue Service, with its 2,316 special agents, spent nearly $11 million on guns, ammunition and military-style equipment.
  9. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) spent $3.1 million on guns, ammunition and military-style equipment. The EPA has spent $715 million on its ‘Criminal Enforcement Division’ from FY2005 to present even as the agency has come under fire for failing to perform its basic functions.
  10. Federal agencies spent $313,958 on paintball equipment, along with $14.7 million on Tasers, $1.6 million on unmanned aircraft, $8.2 million on buckshot, $7.44 million on projectiles, and $4 million on grenades/launchers.
  11. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) spent $11.66 million including more than $200,000 on ‘night vision equipment,’ $2.3 million on ‘armor – personal,’ more than $2 million on guns, and $3.6 million on ammunition. Veterans Affairs has 3,700 law enforcement officers guarding and securing VA medical centers.
  12. 12. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service spent $4.77 million purchasing shotguns, .308 caliber rifles, night vision goggles, propane cannons, liquid explosives, pyro supplies, buckshot, LP gas cannons, drones, remote controlled helicopters, thermal cameras, military waterproof thermal infrared scopes, and more.
OpenTheBooks Oversight Report – The Militarization of America, 
 
 

Back

 

Comments

 

Rate this News Article:



 
   Indicates required field
Name
 
City
 
Email
 
State
 
Comment
 

2000 characters left

Please enter text you see below
 

Puss
D3JV7IrgBdYl, AL
7/20/2016 04:22 AM
 

  I read your post and wished I'd wrttein it

 
 
m
arlington, TX
6/26/2016 02:56 PM
 

  The reason no one in congress does not look into these clear violations of posse commitatus on both sides of the aisle is because there is no two party system. There is no disagreement between congressmen where spending is concerned. There is no disagreement among them where deliberately destroying the rights of the individual and the sovereignty of the people is concerned. Congress only cares about staying in office at any cost and all those costs are paid for with the money they steal from us all. Stand up and fight this scourge of the nation. Stand up and fight this league of worthless self serving talking heads. They care not for anything but the money they can steal from you and to maintain that flow of booty they pirate from us all.

 
 
Janice Infantine
Deposit, NY
6/24/2016 02:46 PM
 

  I believe it is just as worrisome as to WHY they are stockpiling arms and ammo as it is to how much money they're wasting. Every newspaper worth it's salt needs to have a "Government Oversight" page where waste and abuse is regularly published. If the public constantly sees where their tax dollars are being squandered, perhaps they would put more pressure on their representatives to stop the waste.